Make Germany Pay | Twentieth Century History

A schools feature about how the Treaty of Versailles affected Germany in the 1920s after their defeat in World War One.

Clip Info
  • Clip length: 19'53''
  • Broadcast year: 1977
Curriculum Connection
  • History | The Treaty of Versailles
Access

Licence: ERA Licence required

Usage

UK only
Staff and students of licensed education establishments only
Cannot be adapted

Content
  • Provider: BBC
  • Channel: BBC One
  • Programme: Twentieth Century History
  • Episode: Make Germany Pay
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